Gamernode very detailed article and follow-up

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Now a extensive Fallout 3 write up by Gamernode (thanks NMA), with a follow up:

“War…” began Ron Perlman. “War never changes. Since the dawn of humankind, when our ancestors first discovered the killing power of rock and bone, blood has been spilled in the name of everything…” The intro speech goes on for quite a bit longer, but I don’t want to ruin it for anyone, because it kicks ass. Suffice to say, Ron Perlman does a great job at making the beginning of the game draw you in.[…]

The main character’s father is the main vault scientist, and is also voiced by Liam Neeson. He’s trying to get the main character to take the G.O.A.T. to find out what he has to do for the betterment of the Vault. “I had to take it, you’ll have to take it, and so will everyone else,” his father tells him.[…]

It was about that time that we got our first mention of Oblivion. “Think of Oblivion as our freshman effort on next-gen,” he tells us, “and Fallout is our revision and upgrade.”We were then treated to a demonstration of how the Pipboy works in Fallout 3. According to Todd, one of their main goals in upgrading it for Fallout 3 was to make it entertaining for gamers, since they’ll spend a lot of time in its menus. Part of how they did that is the humorous animations; skills and stats have their own picture and description, and most of them are pretty damn funny. One of them, science, features a bespeckled toon sitting in front of a giant retro computer. “This is our actually our lead developer, this is what he looks like,” Todd jokes. “And this is a very early PS3 devkit.”[…]

It was at that point we ran into Mr. Handy. “Good day new sir!” the cheerful robot chimes. “If I may be so bold the blue in the bolt suit contrasts BEAUTIFULLY with your eyes!” As Mr. Handy moves away, he mutters, “you stupid git.” Oh, Mr. Handy!

The exit of the vault is a fairly epic area, and as Todd explains, given its seriousness it really has to be. You need to hack into a computer (or use a password) to open the vault, which involves a lot of whirling gears and shifting metal. After a few moments, Todd is out into the beautiful post apocalyptic sunlight![…]

Once inside, the sheriff greets us, and we’re shown how you can choose two radically different paths. In this instance, Todd can either be peaceful and friendly with the sheriff, or enter the town mocking his hat (“Nice hat, Calamity Jane”); guess which he picked?
After mocking the hat, the sheriff is peeved, and Todd has the choice to try and make things okay again, or keep pushing the sheriff which will end in a fight. Todd ended up switching his mind, so we entered the city proper.[…]

In the center of the town, Todd faced the bomb and was still given the choice to change his mind, but nah, he went for it. Whoops, his skills aren’t high enough. “Luckily I have these drugs I found in the mailbox, and as we all know, drugs make you smarter,” Todd joked. They did the trick, and allowed him to place the charge. With the bomb armed, Todd took off through the metro to arrive at the meet-up spot Mr. Burke decided upon, which happened to be on top of the Galaxy News radio station building (ironically, he was listening to a song at this moment which was talking about a “Happy, happy life!”).

In the underground, Todd was quickly attacked by a super mutant. These guys were big, greenish looking, and very mean. Here he once again displayed VAT attack mode, shooting it in the head, causing it to explode, showering brain bits, jaw bone, and eyes everywhere. “E FOR EVERYBODY!” he jokingly shouted as he shot the corpse to display the effects.[…]

All and all, I was very impressed with what we saw of Fallout 3. The game is very similar to Oblivion in ways, but also vastly different. The Fallout theme is very strong throughout, and the ability to play in a top-down zoomed out mode should please fans of the franchise (whether or not it will work in fights we didn’t see). Will fans of the game like it? I can’t say, because everyone will like and hate some of the things Bethesda has done. What is obvious, though, is that Bethesda is treating this game very seriously, and is trying their hardest to please old fans, as well as bring in the new.

There’s much more in it, do take a look, and remember to check the writer of this article and Gamernode editor Brendon Lindsey’s impressions at NMA, here’s an example:

Just thought I’d answer some of the stuff in here since I didn’t explain some things for starters.

As for how the sheriff/Mr. Burke connection worked, the way they explained it was that if you were nice to the sheriff upon entering town, he would have you go to the bomb to disarm it, rather than arm it. Doing so would obviously not let you do Mr. Burke’s quest. At the same time, while doing either of them you can do the opposite (you can arm it when the sheriff sends you; you can disarm it when Burke sends you) so it’s still open.
I also didn’t do Todd much credit about the chair. I think his intention was to show the way the chair looked in first person (like a full chair) rather than the small one in Fallout. Of course, with images or video, I didn’t really get that down very well. (He was actually a really nice guy, and obviously loved the Fallout games; he gets a lot of flak from a lot of fans for no reason other than making the third one.)

lisac, I don’t think you’re meant to spend nearly 20 hours in the Pipboy Wink. But they do want to make it feel more like an RPG than an FPS, which means a lot of looking at stats, examining equipment, watching skills, etc. Most of the menus/descriptions/items were written with entertainment in mind rather than just telling you X Strength, X charisma, X skill in guns, etc.[…]

Brother None, I don’t know how much VATS will help percentage wise when it comes to hits. I do know that they fixed the percentages extremely high (as high as 99% for headshots) just to show off the position-based damage. I have a quote somewhere about what he was saying…let me look for it.
Here it is. “For this demo, we’ve changed the percentages. Obviously, you won’t always have a huge chance to make a shot, especially a headshot. We wanted to have things like headshots be a last ditch effort. The whole ‘I’m screwed, time to take a shot and pray it works!’ feeling, basically. You’ll be able to hit extremities fairly regularly, but the critical points won’t be smart to go after frequently.”[…]

I’m not really sure if the VATS is supposed to provide an advantage or not. The way I saw it, it looked more like a way to make the game play in a non-FPS mode. They were really trying to showcase the variety of ways the game could be played by showing off FPS, third person, top-down, live FPS fighting, the VATS action point system, etc.

I’ll get back to this on a new post.

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7 thoughts on “Gamernode very detailed article and follow-up

  1. “War… War never changes. Since the dawn of humankind, when our ancestors first discovered the killing power of rock and bone, blood has been spilled in the name of everything…”

    WHAT?! Mas que é esta merda?! WTF?! This as nothing to do with the tone Fallout’s intro set for the game, nothing at all… You call that awesome? Well, I’ll tell you what awesome is (speaking for the writer here):

    War… War never changes. The Romans waged war to gather slaves and wealth. Spain built an empire from its lust for gold and territory. Hitler shaped a battered Germany into an economic superpower. But war never changes. In the 21st century, war was still waged over the resources that could be acquired. Only this time, the spoils of war were also its weapons: petroleum and uranium.

    And I could go on, yes, I wrote it myself…

    P.S.: Ahah, gotcha, it’s from the first Fallout. Of course you fell for it because you didn’t play the game.

  2. I have to agree with Morbus on this one, one of the highlights of Fallout was always the strong dialogue as it was explained how War had always influenced humanity and how history was written by it.
    I just don’t get that from this new opening, they could have written something ‘stronger’.

  3. Heh, Ron Perlman isn’t the problem 😀
    Its great that that they want to create an opening in the same style, but that text.

    “…Since the dawn of humankind, when our ancestors first discovered the killing power of rock and bone, blood has been spilled in the name of everything…”

    Just personal taste, but I find it not as good as the original openings

  4. I don’t like that “in the name of everything” bit much but the rest works for me. Name of everything sounds too general. IIRC the tone conveyed in both FO1/2’s intros were very directly about power/control/greed by naming out rescources/gold/land/population. Fallout 1 set the tone by invoking the names of specific megalomaniacs in Hitler/Stalin/etc you were already primed for THE MASTER. It’ll be interesting to see what the great menace is in fallout 3. Maybe there isn’t one. Maybe it’s just a general foozle consisting of everything to be found in the world.

  5. It’s new opening, narrated by Ron Perlman, in the same tone as the previous ones, I thought people would be happy with it :S

    First of all, I am in no way any close score to “people’s opinion”, so what I say goes for me and for who explicitly agrees with me. Secondly, I didn’t mean Ron’s tone. The single fact that it’s him narrating it (which I knew already, of course) makes everything a lot better. What I was talking about was the writing, that has not in the same tone previous games had. Not in a long long shot. I have a lengthy design document for a post apoc game of my own (quite a cheesy game if you ask me, not to mention the lack of polishing and the unprofessionalism and newbishism of most everything present in it) and the intro (written by me) sounds way better that that one… Who are the writers of Fallout 3?! I hope it’s not the programmers or anything, and I SURE as hell hope it’s not Todd. I mean, who wrote this?!

    Heh, Ron Perlman isn’t the problem 😀
    Its great that that they want to create an opening in the same style, but that text.

    “…Since the dawn of humankind, when our ancestors first discovered the killing power of rock and bone, blood has been spilled in the name of everything…”

    Just personal taste, but I find it not as good as the original openings

    Exactly. From the begging to the end, that text lacks a lot of style: “humankind” sounds lame and forced. A simple “Man” (like in the previous games) would do it, and Ron would do the rest. The you have “our”. What “our”? This is not first person, it’s third person, we’re talking about them mankind, not us mankind. Like in the previous games, I mean. The word “killing” gives me chills, and even more when followed by “power”. “Rock and bone” sounds lame too, I don’t like it, and the mention of “blood” has nothing to do with a nuclear war, or even with Fallout’s world. Fallout’s world was not about blood. It wasn’t even about violence. No, not even about “shades of gray” (which sounds like completely stupid hype to me). It’s about brief war that purged most mankind off existence. But some survived. That’s what fallout’s world is about. Surviving in a post apoc world. Survival. Read the survival guide (Fallout’s manual) and you’ll see.

    Anyway, Tictacs was cooler than this if you ask me.

    Ah ok then, but it’s just one sentence, let’s not jump the gun here

    It’s the OPENING sentence. That would be ok, IF you hadn’t the “adolescentish violence is fanny”, the swearing everywhere, the lack of attention to the setting, the focus on combat, the completely trivial (as for radical) choices you can do, the joke weapons, the disrespect bethesda has for the fans (in words, I mean), the impossibility of completing the game without fighting (face it bro), the lack of subtlety (loling at every corner?), minigames and all that, all those things screaming behind that sentence: “Hey! Don’t forget about us when you talk about Fallout 3!!!”

    Yeah, you can say it’s one sentence, and you’re right. But don’t say I’m wrong just because I can’t prove it. Even more when you know that I’m right.

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